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Good news for cyclists in New Orleans

The city’s bike-share program got cheaper, and residents will soon have more places to lock their bikes.

New Orleans is getting a lot friendlier for cyclists—and that’s not just because the first fall cool front rolled through in time for the weekend. Two bike-friendly announcements dropped this month. First, the rental price for Blue Bikes has decreased from 13 cents per minute to 10 cents per minute. Second, the city is adding 485 new bike racks citywide.

“We hope that the lowered hourly price reflects the needs of the communities Blue Bikes serves,” said director of the office of transportation Laura Bryan in a press release.

The price drop came on the tails of last month’s “Blue Dat” promotion, which provided a free daily hour of ride time to Orleans Parish residents in September. More than 30,000 locals took trips on the bikes, which are a shared venture between the City of New Orleans, Social Bicycles, and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana. The Downtown Development District recognized the bike-share program’s contribution to affordable transportation with a Downtown NOLA award last month.

Residents will soon have more secure places to lock their bikes, as the city will begin the sidewalk and drilling process for 485 new bike racks on Monday, October 15. These racks will complement New Orleans’ 120-plus miles of bike infrastructure, which are currently undergoing a three-month improvement process.

New racks will be installed at the following locations:

  • Central Business District;
  • North Broad Street between Iberville Street and Ursulines Avenue
  • St. Claude Avenue between Elysian Fields Avenue and Press Street
  • North Rampart Street between Canal Street and Esplanade Avenue
  • Harrison Avenue between Canal Boulevard and Orleans Avenue
  • Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard between Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard and Jackson Avenue
  • Newton Street between Teche Street and Behrman Avenue
  • Teche Street between Newton Street and Opelousas Avenue