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A bright blue Victorian home with purple shutters
Algiers Point has colorful Victorian and Craftsman-style architecture, including this Victorian double shotgun home.
Universal Images Group via Getty

An architectural walking tour of Algiers Point

Why not plan a day trip to the West Bank?

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Algiers Point has colorful Victorian and Craftsman-style architecture, including this Victorian double shotgun home.
| Universal Images Group via Getty

November 2019 update: The ferry is projected to be out of order for 7-8 weeks, so Algiers Point can only be accessed by car for now.

Situated on the west bank of the Mississippi River, a five-minute ferry ride away from the Vieux Carre, Algiers Point’s quaint assembly of Victorian homes, small businesses, levee paths, and downtown views have long enticed East Bank residents to cross over for a visit. Some stay for an afternoon; others put down roots, attracted to the neighborhood’s historic sites, affordable real estate, and low crime rates.

“Architecturally, it is stunning—like stepping back in time to the late 1800s,” said longtime Algiers Point resident and real estate agent Michael Verderosa, who has a master’s degree in architectural history from Tulane University.

Established in 1719 by French colonists and annexed by Orleans Parish in 1870, Algiers Point was a holding place for enslaved people in its early days. Later, shipbuilding, saw yards, dry docks and rail yards became its major industries. In 1895, a fire decimated Algiers Point, destroying many of its oldest buildings.

“The neighborhood ... was rebuilt over the next decade or two, primarily with Victorian or Craftsman-style architecture,” Verderosa said. “So when you get off the ferry and walk through the core of Algiers Point, you see a variety of mostly Victorian double shotguns and Craftsman shotguns and bungalows.”

Heading to the best bank (aka the West Bank)? Here’s an architectural walking tour of Algiers Point curated by Verderosa, who describes himself as the neighborhood’s “resident cheerleader.”

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1. Algiers Point/Canal Street Ferry

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101-199 Seguin St
New Orleans, LA 70114

You could drive across the Crescent City Connection, but it’s much more fun (and scenic) to take the ferry, which has been in continual operation since 1827. Plus, visiting the second-oldest neighborhood in Orleans Parish should soon be easier than ever, thanks two new ferry boats, which appear ready to take on passengers (but haven’t yet set out on their maiden voyage, for some reason).

“It’s a ... high-speed catamaran that is going to operate more efficiently and with less overhead, so the hope among our neighbors is that RTA will be able to expand the hours of the ferry,” Verderosa said. “With the new ferries, we hope to have increased and more efficient access.”

A ferry sits in front of a bridge on the Mississippi River The ferry costs only $4 for a round-trip ride.

2. Tavolino Pizza & Lounge

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141 Delaronde St
New Orleans, LA 70114
(504) 605-3365

This pizzeria by the ferry landing is one of Verderosa’s favorite spots.

“I suggest stopping here for a beverage to walk with,” Verderosa said. “They have a tremendous assortment of craft cocktails on the menu, as well as an extensive beer and wine list.”

Verderosa also recommends the Crown and Anchor British Pub, the Dry Dock Café, and the Old Point Bar.

3. Delaronde and Olivier streets

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705 Pelican Ave
New Orleans, LA 70114

Next, “leave Tavolino and take a right,” Verderosa suggested.

Many houses on Olivier Street survived the fire, so the street is worth seeing.

“Walk the length of Delaronde and turn right onto Olivier Street for the best glimpse into the antebellum architecture remaining in Algiers Point,” Verderosa said. “Nearby blocks of Vallette Street and Pelican Avenue also will dazzle connoisseurs of architecture.”

4. Algiers Levee Trail (Jazz Walk of Fame)

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Ferry Terminal
New Orleans, LA 70114
(504) 589-4841

A statue of Louis Armstrong heralds the beginning of the Jazz Walk of Fame. This paved walking and biking path connects the Algiers ferry landing to DeArmas Street and boasts beautiful views of downtown, as well as 60 interactive lamps (press a button on the lamp to hear an informative audio recording).

“Circle back up Vallette Street to the levee for one of the best parts of Algiers Point—our levee view,” Verderosa said. “We have 4.5 miles of paved levee bike paths with the most extraordinary view of downtown. When CNN films downtown New Orleans, they set up their cameras from here.”

5. Cita Dennis Hubbell Library

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725 Pelican Ave
New Orleans, LA 70114

Funded by Andrew Carnegie, the Cita Dennis Hubbell Branch Library opened in 1907. It’s one of Rathbone DeBuy’s designs and a prime example of Beaux-Arts classical architecture

“We have the city’s oldest library building that’s still in use as a library,” Verderosa said. “It’s adorable, very small-town America—and still very much utilized by our neighbors.”

6. Algiers Courthouse

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Morgan St
New Orleans, LA 70114
(504) 407-0436
Visit Website

The brick, round-arched Italianate structure was built in 1896 and still provides Algiers with government services—elopements at the picturesque courthouse being one of most popular.

“It’s a landmark of Algiers Point, and really, of the entire city of New Orleans,” Verderosa said. “The building features elements of both Richardsonian Romanesque and Moorish architecture and was very recently renovated.”

1. Algiers Point/Canal Street Ferry

101-199 Seguin St, New Orleans, LA 70114
A ferry sits in front of a bridge on the Mississippi River The ferry costs only $4 for a round-trip ride.

You could drive across the Crescent City Connection, but it’s much more fun (and scenic) to take the ferry, which has been in continual operation since 1827. Plus, visiting the second-oldest neighborhood in Orleans Parish should soon be easier than ever, thanks two new ferry boats, which appear ready to take on passengers (but haven’t yet set out on their maiden voyage, for some reason).

“It’s a ... high-speed catamaran that is going to operate more efficiently and with less overhead, so the hope among our neighbors is that RTA will be able to expand the hours of the ferry,” Verderosa said. “With the new ferries, we hope to have increased and more efficient access.”

101-199 Seguin St
New Orleans, LA 70114

2. Tavolino Pizza & Lounge

141 Delaronde St, New Orleans, LA 70114

This pizzeria by the ferry landing is one of Verderosa’s favorite spots.

“I suggest stopping here for a beverage to walk with,” Verderosa said. “They have a tremendous assortment of craft cocktails on the menu, as well as an extensive beer and wine list.”

Verderosa also recommends the Crown and Anchor British Pub, the Dry Dock Café, and the Old Point Bar.

141 Delaronde St
New Orleans, LA 70114

3. Delaronde and Olivier streets

705 Pelican Ave, New Orleans, LA 70114

Next, “leave Tavolino and take a right,” Verderosa suggested.

Many houses on Olivier Street survived the fire, so the street is worth seeing.

“Walk the length of Delaronde and turn right onto Olivier Street for the best glimpse into the antebellum architecture remaining in Algiers Point,” Verderosa said. “Nearby blocks of Vallette Street and Pelican Avenue also will dazzle connoisseurs of architecture.”

705 Pelican Ave
New Orleans, LA 70114

4. Algiers Levee Trail (Jazz Walk of Fame)

Ferry Terminal, New Orleans, LA 70114

A statue of Louis Armstrong heralds the beginning of the Jazz Walk of Fame. This paved walking and biking path connects the Algiers ferry landing to DeArmas Street and boasts beautiful views of downtown, as well as 60 interactive lamps (press a button on the lamp to hear an informative audio recording).

“Circle back up Vallette Street to the levee for one of the best parts of Algiers Point—our levee view,” Verderosa said. “We have 4.5 miles of paved levee bike paths with the most extraordinary view of downtown. When CNN films downtown New Orleans, they set up their cameras from here.”

Ferry Terminal
New Orleans, LA 70114

5. Cita Dennis Hubbell Library

725 Pelican Ave, New Orleans, LA 70114

Funded by Andrew Carnegie, the Cita Dennis Hubbell Branch Library opened in 1907. It’s one of Rathbone DeBuy’s designs and a prime example of Beaux-Arts classical architecture

“We have the city’s oldest library building that’s still in use as a library,” Verderosa said. “It’s adorable, very small-town America—and still very much utilized by our neighbors.”

725 Pelican Ave
New Orleans, LA 70114

6. Algiers Courthouse

Morgan St, New Orleans, LA 70114

The brick, round-arched Italianate structure was built in 1896 and still provides Algiers with government services—elopements at the picturesque courthouse being one of most popular.

“It’s a landmark of Algiers Point, and really, of the entire city of New Orleans,” Verderosa said. “The building features elements of both Richardsonian Romanesque and Moorish architecture and was very recently renovated.”

Morgan St
New Orleans, LA 70114