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10 monuments and sites to see in New Orleans right now

History around every corner

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There’s no question that New Orleans is a city filled with history. For starters, it has several homes built and maintained from the 19th century. It’s also holds some of the oldest churches and cathedrals in the country.

Nearly every corner is an opportunity to learn more about New Orleans and the people behind building it.

Here is a map of 10 special locations to visit that encapsulate the essence behind the city’s identity.

Did we miss anything? Drop a comment below.

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1. Hurricane Katrina Sculpture - House In A Tree

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1101-, 1199 Convention Center Blvd
New Orleans, LA 70130

Created by Sally Heller, and officially unveiled in August of 2009, this New Orleans art piece commemorates the fourth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Right across from the Ernest M. Morial Convention Center, the piece depicts a shotgun-like home trapped in a dead tree—which can be associated with the many possessions and parts of homes found in trees after the 2005 disaster. 

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2. Algeirs Point War Memorial

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436 Verret St
New Orleans, LA 70114

Right in the middle of Algiers Point sits a monument that honors residents of the neighborhood that have fallen in combat. The four sided monument list names of neighborhood soldiers that fought in U.S. wars as early as World War I. 

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3. Tomb of the Unknown Slave

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1210 Governor Nicholls St
New Orleans, LA 70116
(504) 525-5934

Placed against the St Augustine Church, (one of the oldest Catholic churches in the city), this monument honors slaves of African descent that have died in New Orleans and were buried in unmarked graves. 

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4. Hurricane Katrina Monument

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1599 Tennessee St
New Orleans, LA 70117

This monument sits on neutral ground on Claiborne Avenue, just off the overpass. Unveiled in 2006, this depiction of an unfinished house was dedicated to the survivors of Hurricane Katrina, and their determination to rebuild their communities. 

via Google Maps.

5. Mardi Gras Fountain

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Lakeshore Dr
New Orleans, LA 70124
(504) 658-4000

On a more festive theme, this fountain and art tribute in Lakeview honors over 90 New Orleans Mardi Gras Carnival krewes.  

A post shared by Jeffrey Kerst (@jkerst) on

6. New Orleans Holocaust Memorial

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River St
New Orleans, LA 70114

Dedicated in 2003, Artist Yaacov Adam created this art piece to honor the lives of millions of Holocaust victims. Categorized as kinetic art, this installation changes as you move around it.

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7. Old Spanish Fort

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Beauregard Ave
New Orleans, LA 70124

While it might not be the most exciting site, New Orleans holds the ruins of a nearly 300-year-old fort operated by Spanish soldiers. The fort was decommissioned after 1823.

As a fun fact, an amusement part operated on this site between 1880 and 1908.

Photo via Infrogmation/Wikimedia Commons

8. Joan of Arc

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Place de France, Decatur St
New Orleans, LA 70116

There’s no question that New Orleans has strong French roots. Celebrating its history is a sizable statue of Joan of Arc sits right across from the French Market. The historical figure led the French Military in the 1400s. 

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9. Marie Laveau’s Tomb

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425 Basin St
New Orleans, LA 70112
(504) 596-3050
Visit Website

A sightseeing trip in New Orleans can’t be complete until you’ve seen Marie Laveau’s tomb. As she is believed the be buried in this cemetery, Laveau reigned as a powerful voodoo practitioner that granted fortunes, and advice.

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10. Congo Square

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700 N Rampart St
New Orleans, LA 70116
(504) 658-3200
Visit Website

This section of Treme served as a music grounds for slaves of African descent in the 18th and 19th centuries. As a place of refuge, many of the slaves danced, performed and exchanged musical traditions between each other.

In fact, the Congo Square Preservation Society upholds part of the tradition by holding drum circles at the site on Sundays.

1. Hurricane Katrina Sculpture - House In A Tree

1101-, 1199 Convention Center Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70130

Created by Sally Heller, and officially unveiled in August of 2009, this New Orleans art piece commemorates the fourth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Right across from the Ernest M. Morial Convention Center, the piece depicts a shotgun-like home trapped in a dead tree—which can be associated with the many possessions and parts of homes found in trees after the 2005 disaster. 

1101-, 1199 Convention Center Blvd
New Orleans, LA 70130

2. Algeirs Point War Memorial

436 Verret St, New Orleans, LA 70114

Right in the middle of Algiers Point sits a monument that honors residents of the neighborhood that have fallen in combat. The four sided monument list names of neighborhood soldiers that fought in U.S. wars as early as World War I. 

436 Verret St
New Orleans, LA 70114

3. Tomb of the Unknown Slave

1210 Governor Nicholls St, New Orleans, LA 70116

Placed against the St Augustine Church, (one of the oldest Catholic churches in the city), this monument honors slaves of African descent that have died in New Orleans and were buried in unmarked graves. 

1210 Governor Nicholls St
New Orleans, LA 70116

4. Hurricane Katrina Monument

1599 Tennessee St, New Orleans, LA 70117
via Google Maps.

This monument sits on neutral ground on Claiborne Avenue, just off the overpass. Unveiled in 2006, this depiction of an unfinished house was dedicated to the survivors of Hurricane Katrina, and their determination to rebuild their communities. 

1599 Tennessee St
New Orleans, LA 70117

5. Mardi Gras Fountain

Lakeshore Dr, New Orleans, LA 70124

On a more festive theme, this fountain and art tribute in Lakeview honors over 90 New Orleans Mardi Gras Carnival krewes.  

Lakeshore Dr
New Orleans, LA 70124

6. New Orleans Holocaust Memorial

River St, New Orleans, LA 70114

Dedicated in 2003, Artist Yaacov Adam created this art piece to honor the lives of millions of Holocaust victims. Categorized as kinetic art, this installation changes as you move around it.

River St
New Orleans, LA 70114

7. Old Spanish Fort

Beauregard Ave, New Orleans, LA 70124
Photo via Infrogmation/Wikimedia Commons

While it might not be the most exciting site, New Orleans holds the ruins of a nearly 300-year-old fort operated by Spanish soldiers. The fort was decommissioned after 1823.

As a fun fact, an amusement part operated on this site between 1880 and 1908.

Beauregard Ave
New Orleans, LA 70124

8. Joan of Arc

Place de France, Decatur St, New Orleans, LA 70116

There’s no question that New Orleans has strong French roots. Celebrating its history is a sizable statue of Joan of Arc sits right across from the French Market. The historical figure led the French Military in the 1400s. 

Place de France, Decatur St
New Orleans, LA 70116

9. Marie Laveau’s Tomb

425 Basin St, New Orleans, LA 70112

A sightseeing trip in New Orleans can’t be complete until you’ve seen Marie Laveau’s tomb. As she is believed the be buried in this cemetery, Laveau reigned as a powerful voodoo practitioner that granted fortunes, and advice.

425 Basin St
New Orleans, LA 70112

10. Congo Square

700 N Rampart St, New Orleans, LA 70116

This section of Treme served as a music grounds for slaves of African descent in the 18th and 19th centuries. As a place of refuge, many of the slaves danced, performed and exchanged musical traditions between each other.

In fact, the Congo Square Preservation Society upholds part of the tradition by holding drum circles at the site on Sundays.

700 N Rampart St
New Orleans, LA 70116