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New Orleans Marks 300th Anniversary Of Its Founding Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

10 museums you can visit in the French Quarter

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New Orleans’s oldest neighborhood is jam-packed with history. In the French Quarter you can find museums on Victorian lifestyle, Mardi Gras, Jazz, and Voodoo, just to name a few. Most of all, these museums are moments from one another.

From the historic Cabildo to the new Irish Cultural Museum, here are 10 museums to visit in the French Quarter.

But this doesn’t mean the city doesn’t have more to offer.

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Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture

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If you’re interested in the effort that goes into costuming during Mardi Gras, then check out this French Quarter museum. Featuring the collection of Carl Mack, the museum has maskings worn by carnival kings and queens, Mardi Gras Indians, and independent costuming groups.

Irish Cultural Museum

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Built in 2013, this museum located near the edge of the French Quarter has a Spanish Courtyard and a coffee and whiskey bar. Through several interactive kiosks and an exclusive documentary showing, the museum showcases the contributions of Irish residents in New Orleans, dating back to the mid-19th century.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

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Founded in 1966, The Historic New Orleans Collection has two campuses: one on Royal Street and the other on Chartres Street.

Its Royal Street campus has a permanent gallery on Louisiana history; a hall for rotating exhibitions; and house museum called the Williams Residence—which, according to the THNOC, “is the only French Quarter house open to the public with its original furnishings.”

Its Chartres Street campus holds the Williams Research Center, the Boyd Cruise gallery, and thousands of historic artifacts that encapsulate life New Orleans over the last 300 years.

New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

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If you’re looking for an off-beat experience on New Orleans history, check out this eccentric museum that is housed in a 19th-century pharmacy. The New Orleans Pharmacy Museum showcases formerly popular medicines, including potions and leeches.

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The Cabildo

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Part of the Louisiana State Museum system, it has two permanent exhibits on the development of New Orleans over the last 300 years. The Cabildo has a three-story exhibit that follows the contributions of several ethnic groups to New Orleans, as well.

The Cabildo formerly operated as New Orleans’s seat of government. It’s also where the Louisiana purchase took place in 1803.

New Orleans Historic Voodoo Museum

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This museum has art, relics, and document that track the development of Voodoo in the city. Officials at the museum lead a Voodoo-based cemetery tour in the city, too.

The Presbytère

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This is the second of two buildings that flank the St. Louis Cathedral at Jackson Square. Created to complement the Cabildo in the late 18th century, the city used this building as a courthouse until 1911. The Louisiana State Museum was then given authority over this building.

The Presbytère holds an exhibit on life in New Orleans after hurricanes Betsy and Katrina. Until December 30 of 2018, it will host an exhibit of the development of Mardi Gras in New Orleans, and a separate installation on the history of women in Mardi Gras.

Gallier House

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One of our favorite historic homes to tour in New Orleans, this restored Victorian was built over 150 years ago. Owned by architects James Gallier and James Gallier Jr., the house museum is a time capsule of Victorian-era lifestyle, complete with antiques and then-luxurious technologies.

Old Ursuline Convent Museum

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This French Quarter structure dates back to 1752, and stands as one of the oldest buildings from the French colonial period. The museum operated as a convent, orphanage, and school until 1824.

Today, the Old Ursuline Convent has a lavish courtyard and a series of permanent and rotating exhibits. You’ll find brilliant sculptures, historical artifacts, and a magnificent sanctuary. Apart of New Orleans tricentennial, the museum has an exhibit on the history of Catholicism in the city.

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New Orleans Jazz Museum

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This Louisiana State Museum celebrates the city’s development of jazz through rotating exhibits. It often holds artifacts, documents, and recordings of jazz icons. The museum holds concerts in its state-of-the-art performance hall, located on its third floor.

The New Orleans Jazz Museum has plans for a permanent exhibit in 2020.

Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture

If you’re interested in the effort that goes into costuming during Mardi Gras, then check out this French Quarter museum. Featuring the collection of Carl Mack, the museum has maskings worn by carnival kings and queens, Mardi Gras Indians, and independent costuming groups.

Irish Cultural Museum

Built in 2013, this museum located near the edge of the French Quarter has a Spanish Courtyard and a coffee and whiskey bar. Through several interactive kiosks and an exclusive documentary showing, the museum showcases the contributions of Irish residents in New Orleans, dating back to the mid-19th century.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Founded in 1966, The Historic New Orleans Collection has two campuses: one on Royal Street and the other on Chartres Street.

Its Royal Street campus has a permanent gallery on Louisiana history; a hall for rotating exhibitions; and house museum called the Williams Residence—which, according to the THNOC, “is the only French Quarter house open to the public with its original furnishings.”

Its Chartres Street campus holds the Williams Research Center, the Boyd Cruise gallery, and thousands of historic artifacts that encapsulate life New Orleans over the last 300 years.

New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

If you’re looking for an off-beat experience on New Orleans history, check out this eccentric museum that is housed in a 19th-century pharmacy. The New Orleans Pharmacy Museum showcases formerly popular medicines, including potions and leeches.

A post shared by @melissasemiao on

The Cabildo

Part of the Louisiana State Museum system, it has two permanent exhibits on the development of New Orleans over the last 300 years. The Cabildo has a three-story exhibit that follows the contributions of several ethnic groups to New Orleans, as well.

The Cabildo formerly operated as New Orleans’s seat of government. It’s also where the Louisiana purchase took place in 1803.

New Orleans Historic Voodoo Museum

This museum has art, relics, and document that track the development of Voodoo in the city. Officials at the museum lead a Voodoo-based cemetery tour in the city, too.

The Presbytère

This is the second of two buildings that flank the St. Louis Cathedral at Jackson Square. Created to complement the Cabildo in the late 18th century, the city used this building as a courthouse until 1911. The Louisiana State Museum was then given authority over this building.

The Presbytère holds an exhibit on life in New Orleans after hurricanes Betsy and Katrina. Until December 30 of 2018, it will host an exhibit of the development of Mardi Gras in New Orleans, and a separate installation on the history of women in Mardi Gras.

Gallier House

One of our favorite historic homes to tour in New Orleans, this restored Victorian was built over 150 years ago. Owned by architects James Gallier and James Gallier Jr., the house museum is a time capsule of Victorian-era lifestyle, complete with antiques and then-luxurious technologies.

Old Ursuline Convent Museum

This French Quarter structure dates back to 1752, and stands as one of the oldest buildings from the French colonial period. The museum operated as a convent, orphanage, and school until 1824.

Today, the Old Ursuline Convent has a lavish courtyard and a series of permanent and rotating exhibits. You’ll find brilliant sculptures, historical artifacts, and a magnificent sanctuary. Apart of New Orleans tricentennial, the museum has an exhibit on the history of Catholicism in the city.

A post shared by Fraser (@flavour2804) on

New Orleans Jazz Museum

This Louisiana State Museum celebrates the city’s development of jazz through rotating exhibits. It often holds artifacts, documents, and recordings of jazz icons. The museum holds concerts in its state-of-the-art performance hall, located on its third floor.

The New Orleans Jazz Museum has plans for a permanent exhibit in 2020.