clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A row of houses on a New Orleans street. Each house is a different color.

Ranking 17 New Orleans neighborhoods from most to least walkable

How does your neighborhood stack up?

View as Map

Laid out in the 19th century by French architect Adrien de Pauger, New Orleans once solely consisted of the dense, grid-like Vieux Carre, and the city spread from there. Because it was created in a car-less world and designed for pedestrians and horse-drawn carriages, it’s no surprise that New Orleans remains compact and highly walkable, especially in its older neighborhoods.

But how do New Orleans neighborhoods compare in terms of walkability?

This Week, Curbed New Orleans mapped out 17 neighborhoods, ranking them from most to least walkable based on data from Walk Score. Using a 100-point scale, the data firm ranks neighborhoods based on general pedestrian safety and ease of completing errands on foot. Walk Score rated more than 72 neighborhoods, rating the New Orleans as a whole at 58, which is somewhat walkable.

Here’s a list of the most and least walkable neighborhoods in the city. Want to see more neighborhood scores? Check out Walk Score’s official website.

Read More

French Quarter - 98

Copy Link

It’s no surprise that New Orleans’ oldest, most famous neighborhood is also its most walkable. Compact in size, the French Quarter has a variety of markets, restaurants, and shops squeezed in between Canal Street and Esplanade Avenue.

A post shared by Jillian (@thejillianmarieblog) on

Central Business District - 94

Copy Link

A condominium-heavy portion of the city, most of the Central Business District is built around resident efficiency. Thanks to the Rouses market, development of the South Market District, and amenity-packed mixed-use condominiums, running errands on foot can be a breeze.

Marigny - 93

Copy Link

Another tight-knit district ranks as the most walkable in the city. Located just east of the French Quarter, the neighborhood shares access to its local businesses, markets, and leisure spaces.

A post shared by @emcakes_nola on

Lower Garden District - 91

Copy Link

Laid out in 1809 at a somewhat grander scale than the French Quarter, the Lower Garden District has access to Magazine Street’s retailers, petite parks, a bike lane, and low traffic streets.

Garden District - 88

Copy Link

If you set a day aside, it’s possible to walk the entirety of the Garden District, which is a perfect way to see some historic and beautiful homes in the city.

A brown sign with words that read: Garden District.

Irish Channel - 87

Copy Link

Characterized by double shotguns and known for its St. Patrick’s Day parade, this quaint neighborhood by the river has a variety of local shops, a market, and shares a portion of commercial space on Magazine Street with the Garden District.

Uptown New Orleans - 86

Copy Link

Uptown is something of an umbrella term that encompasses several neighborhoods-within-a neighborhood. St. Charles Avenue doubles as a jogging path, and Napoleon Avenue also has a pedestrian-friendly walkway on its neutral ground.

A post shared by Claire (@cethriff) on

East Carrollton - 86

Copy Link

This New Orleans neighborhood boasts bustling Oak Street and the Riverbend area, which holds a number of shops, restaurants, and entertainment spaces.

Central City - 83

Copy Link

Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard is a designated Cultural District and a growing corridor. It boasts an independent movie theater, the Ashe’ Cultural Arts Center, museums, and an assortment of restaurants.

A post shared by Lee Curran (@notrex) on

Bywater - 83

Copy Link

Part of the “sliver by the river,” this historically working-class neighborhood tucked between the Industrial Canal and the Press Street train tracks has become ground zero for gentrification. Luxury condo developments have joined its colorful assembly of shotgun homes, Creole cottages, and industrial buildings. Crescent Park, a 1.4-mile linear riverfront park, connects Bywater to the Marigny and French Quarter.

A post shared by @the_kitchen_bitch on

Treme - Lafitte - 80

Copy Link

Another historic neighborhood with low-impact streets, Treme has shops on its larger thoroughfares, including Orleans, Broad, Esplanade, and Rampart avenues. Its other walkable locations include Louis Armstrong Park and a significant portion of the Lafitte Greenway.

Mid-City - 76

Copy Link

What Mid-City lacks in density, it makes up for with easy access to the Lafitte Greenway and the Jefferson Davis Parkway Walking Path. Parts of Carrollton, Broad and Tulane avenues can be challenging to walk during rush hour, but new bike path infrastructure is making the neighborhood safer for pedestrians and cyclists alike.

A post shared by Jeanne (@dawlin1) on

Audubon - 72

Copy Link

Coming in with a respectable (but not amazing) score of 72 is Audubon. Its perks include shady sidewalks and access to Audubon Park’s lagoons, playgrounds, and walking paths.

Seventh Ward - 72

Copy Link

St. Bernard and Esplanade Avenues are two commercial corridors that make it possible to accomplish many tasks on foot, but the 7th Ward remains a primarily residential neighborhood. Highlights include the recently reopened Nora Navra Public Library, Saint Louis Cemetery No. 3, and the Fairgrounds Race Course.

Freret - 71

Copy Link

One of the most walkable parts of this neighborhood, which enjoys easy access to Tulane and Loyola universities, is the Freret Street Corridor. Freret Street is a bustling assembly of restaurants, coffee shops, yoga studios, and more. Because the vehicular speed limit is capped at 25 miles per hour, pedestrians will have a less challenging time walking from business to business.

A post shared by Sal (@agnello_sal) on

Algiers Point - 68

Copy Link

Possibly one the the family-friendly neighborhoods in New Orleans, historic Algiers Point has nothing but low-impact roadways (partially excluding Opelousas Avenue)—and its scenic, oak-shaded collection of Queen Anne Victorians, shotgun homes, and corner stores gives us major Mayberry vibes.

A post shared by Mackirks (@mackirks) on

Lower Ninth Ward - 48

Copy Link

What the lower 9th Ward lacks in neighborhood resources (it just got its first CVS since Hurricane Katrina in 2016), it makes up for with quiet, walkable streets and notable architecture (the Doullut steamboat houses and Jackson Barracks, to name a few historic sites). The levee walking path, green space, and gorgeous downtown views are its loveliest amenities.

French Quarter - 98

It’s no surprise that New Orleans’ oldest, most famous neighborhood is also its most walkable. Compact in size, the French Quarter has a variety of markets, restaurants, and shops squeezed in between Canal Street and Esplanade Avenue.

A post shared by Jillian (@thejillianmarieblog) on

Central Business District - 94

A condominium-heavy portion of the city, most of the Central Business District is built around resident efficiency. Thanks to the Rouses market, development of the South Market District, and amenity-packed mixed-use condominiums, running errands on foot can be a breeze.

Marigny - 93

Another tight-knit district ranks as the most walkable in the city. Located just east of the French Quarter, the neighborhood shares access to its local businesses, markets, and leisure spaces.

A post shared by @emcakes_nola on

Lower Garden District - 91

Laid out in 1809 at a somewhat grander scale than the French Quarter, the Lower Garden District has access to Magazine Street’s retailers, petite parks, a bike lane, and low traffic streets.

Garden District - 88

A brown sign with words that read: Garden District.

If you set a day aside, it’s possible to walk the entirety of the Garden District, which is a perfect way to see some historic and beautiful homes in the city.

A brown sign with words that read: Garden District.

Irish Channel - 87

Characterized by double shotguns and known for its St. Patrick’s Day parade, this quaint neighborhood by the river has a variety of local shops, a market, and shares a portion of commercial space on Magazine Street with the Garden District.

Uptown New Orleans - 86

Uptown is something of an umbrella term that encompasses several neighborhoods-within-a neighborhood. St. Charles Avenue doubles as a jogging path, and Napoleon Avenue also has a pedestrian-friendly walkway on its neutral ground.

A post shared by Claire (@cethriff) on

East Carrollton - 86

This New Orleans neighborhood boasts bustling Oak Street and the Riverbend area, which holds a number of shops, restaurants, and entertainment spaces.

Central City - 83

Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard is a designated Cultural District and a growing corridor. It boasts an independent movie theater, the Ashe’ Cultural Arts Center, museums, and an assortment of restaurants.

A post shared by Lee Curran (@notrex) on

Bywater - 83

Part of the “sliver by the river,” this historically working-class neighborhood tucked between the Industrial Canal and the Press Street train tracks has become ground zero for gentrification. Luxury condo developments have joined its colorful assembly of shotgun homes, Creole cottages, and industrial buildings. Crescent Park, a 1.4-mile linear riverfront park, connects Bywater to the Marigny and French Quarter.

A post shared by @the_kitchen_bitch on

Treme - Lafitte - 80

Another historic neighborhood with low-impact streets, Treme has shops on its larger thoroughfares, including Orleans, Broad, Esplanade, and Rampart avenues. Its other walkable locations include Louis Armstrong Park and a significant portion of the Lafitte Greenway.

Mid-City - 76

What Mid-City lacks in density, it makes up for with easy access to the Lafitte Greenway and the Jefferson Davis Parkway Walking Path. Parts of Carrollton, Broad and Tulane avenues can be challenging to walk during rush hour, but new bike path infrastructure is making the neighborhood safer for pedestrians and cyclists alike.

A post shared by Jeanne (@dawlin1) on

Audubon - 72

Coming in with a respectable (but not amazing) score of 72 is Audubon. Its perks include shady sidewalks and access to Audubon Park’s lagoons, playgrounds, and walking paths.

Seventh Ward - 72

St. Bernard and Esplanade Avenues are two commercial corridors that make it possible to accomplish many tasks on foot, but the 7th Ward remains a primarily residential neighborhood. Highlights include the recently reopened Nora Navra Public Library, Saint Louis Cemetery No. 3, and the Fairgrounds Race Course.

Freret - 71

One of the most walkable parts of this neighborhood, which enjoys easy access to Tulane and Loyola universities, is the Freret Street Corridor. Freret Street is a bustling assembly of restaurants, coffee shops, yoga studios, and more. Because the vehicular speed limit is capped at 25 miles per hour, pedestrians will have a less challenging time walking from business to business.

A post shared by Sal (@agnello_sal) on

Algiers Point - 68

Possibly one the the family-friendly neighborhoods in New Orleans, historic Algiers Point has nothing but low-impact roadways (partially excluding Opelousas Avenue)—and its scenic, oak-shaded collection of Queen Anne Victorians, shotgun homes, and corner stores gives us major Mayberry vibes.

A post shared by Mackirks (@mackirks) on

Lower Ninth Ward - 48

What the lower 9th Ward lacks in neighborhood resources (it just got its first CVS since Hurricane Katrina in 2016), it makes up for with quiet, walkable streets and notable architecture (the Doullut steamboat houses and Jackson Barracks, to name a few historic sites). The levee walking path, green space, and gorgeous downtown views are its loveliest amenities.