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Mardi Gras Indian Costumes at the backstreet Cultural Museum
Mardi Gras Indian Costumes at the backstreet Cultural Museum
By Barry Solow, Wikimedia Commons

Places to visit in NOLA during Black History Month

A growing list of museums, events and places to visit during Black History Month

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Mardi Gras Indian Costumes at the backstreet Cultural Museum
| By Barry Solow, Wikimedia Commons

February marks the beginning of Black History Month, where many are invited to learn about the impact of African-Americans on U.S history. In New Orleans, there are several places to celebrate and learn more about Black History, and even the history of your personal background.

This month, Curbed New Orleans will update a list to cover all of the Black History Months events. Places and events that are time sensitive will have expiring dates and times in the title. Otherwise, mark your calendars and keep a close eye on this map, because it will be updated several times over the course of the month!

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Ashe Cultural Arts Center

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The Ashe Cultural Arts Center is hosting a variety of Black art exhibits throughout the month of February. The Martin Luther King Jr. Exhibit is currently being held at Ashe, where students and artist all over the nation submit visual pieces that serve as their interpretations of one of many of King's speeches.

A photo posted by Jimmy Shelton (@wytefangg) on

Algiers Regional Library (February 14, 6 p.m.)

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On Tuesday, February 14, at 6 p.m., The Algiers Regional Library will screen: Southside with You. Based on a true story, the movie is an account of the first date between Future U.S. President Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson (future first lady).

A photo posted by Friends Of NOPL (@friends_nopl) on

The Backstreet Cultural Museum

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Open Tuesday to Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., is the Backstreet Cultural Museum, a jewel located in the oldest African-American neighborhood in New Orleans. The Backstreet Cultural Museum hosts a variety memorabilia significant to African-American and New Orleans History. From Mardi Gras Indian costume collections to reading on Jazz Funerals, traditions of all kind can be found here. Admission is $10 per person.The museum is closed on Mondays.

A photo posted by @mghmghmghm on

Lower Ninth Ward Living Museum

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Black History Month serves as a reflection on how far neighborhoods, cities, states and the nation has progressed. In light of that reflection, reviewing the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina is also important.

The Lower Ninth Ward Living Museum tells the story of over 60 local residents and their experience living in the Lower Ninth Ward before and after Hurricane Katrina. 



The six room exhibit is open Tuesday to Sunday, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission to the museum is free.

George and Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art

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Another way to celebrate the commemorative month is to experience it through art. The George and Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art collects local, national and international art and exhibits created by various individuals in the African Diaspora.

The museum is open by appointment only. Admission is $10 per person. Students and senior admission is $7.

Le Musée de f.p.c.

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The Le Musee de f.p.c (free people of color) is a historic home museum that showcases the culture and history of free people of color in New Orleans from pre-civil war to post civil-rights. Admission to the museum is $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Tours are available Wednesday through Sunday at 1 p.m. by appointment only. Larger groups can request tours outside of designated appointment times.

A photo posted by Crystal D Paull (@cpaullatx) on

New Orleans Public Library Main Branch (February 13, 6 p.m.)

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On Monday, February 13, 6 p.m.Library Branch will screen The 13th, a documentary directed by Ava DuVernay, which is a close look at the prison system in the United States and how it is intertwined with racial inequality.

A photo posted by @doctoredphotographs on

Norman Mayer Library (February 18, 1p.m.)

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On Saturday, February 18, at 1 p.m., the Norman Mayer Library is hosting a Black History month story time for children between the ages of 5-12. The library is urging participants to RSVP for the event.

Robert E. Smith Regional Library (February 7, 6 p.m.)

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On Tuesday, February 7, at 6 p.m., the Norman Mayer Library Branch will screen The 13th, a documentary directed by Ava DuVernay, which is a close look at the prison system in the United States and how it is intertwined with racial inequality.

Latter Library Branch (February 11, 1 p.m.)

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This weekend, on Saturday, February 11, at 1 p.m., the Latter Library branch library will host a Gullah Folklore event, which paints a story of descendants of West African slaves in the Southern United States

A photo posted by Berry (@berrylikestraw) on

Dillard University (February 15, 6 p.m.)

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Dillard University will screen the 2015 Documentary “Rosenwald,” which is the story of a businessman in the early 1900’s who spent his wealth in the American South, building over 5,000 schools. The event will be held in Dillard’s Georges auditorium on Wednesday Feb. 15, at 6 p.m. The event is free an open to the public.

Xavier University (February 16, 6 p.m.)

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On Wednesday, Feb. 16, in Xavier's university Center, New York Daily News senior justice writer Shaun King will speak on his experience in the Black Lives Matter movement. The event is free and open to the public.

A photo posted by Shaun King (@shaunking) on

Studio BE

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Located in the Bywater is a 35,000 square foot warehouse that has been temporarily converted into a solo visual art exhibit. Studio BE is the brainchild of Brandan “BMike” Odums, a native of New Orleans and a community advocate. The exhibit Studio Be, a series of spray painted art that reflects Odums consciousness and concerns of social issues plaguing the United States, is the final installment of Odum’s “BE” series. The Studio, opened Wednesday through Saturday, from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., is planned to close permanently in May 2017.

A photo posted by Studio BE (@studio_be_) on

Amistad Research Center

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The Amistad Research Center has the nation largest reserve of manuscripts regarding Africans America, race relations and civil rights. The center has over 15 million documents. The Amistad is free and open to the public, Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

A photo posted by Amanda✨ (@amanda_learning) on

East New Orleans Library (February 18, 11 a.m)

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This weekend, on Saturday, February 18, at 11 a.m., the East New Orleans Library will host a Gullah Folklore event, which paints a story of descendants of West African slaves in the Southern United States

Ashe Cultural Arts Center

The Ashe Cultural Arts Center is hosting a variety of Black art exhibits throughout the month of February. The Martin Luther King Jr. Exhibit is currently being held at Ashe, where students and artist all over the nation submit visual pieces that serve as their interpretations of one of many of King's speeches.

A photo posted by Jimmy Shelton (@wytefangg) on

Algiers Regional Library (February 14, 6 p.m.)

On Tuesday, February 14, at 6 p.m., The Algiers Regional Library will screen: Southside with You. Based on a true story, the movie is an account of the first date between Future U.S. President Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson (future first lady).

A photo posted by Friends Of NOPL (@friends_nopl) on

The Backstreet Cultural Museum

Open Tuesday to Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., is the Backstreet Cultural Museum, a jewel located in the oldest African-American neighborhood in New Orleans. The Backstreet Cultural Museum hosts a variety memorabilia significant to African-American and New Orleans History. From Mardi Gras Indian costume collections to reading on Jazz Funerals, traditions of all kind can be found here. Admission is $10 per person.The museum is closed on Mondays.

A photo posted by @mghmghmghm on

Lower Ninth Ward Living Museum

Black History Month serves as a reflection on how far neighborhoods, cities, states and the nation has progressed. In light of that reflection, reviewing the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina is also important.

The Lower Ninth Ward Living Museum tells the story of over 60 local residents and their experience living in the Lower Ninth Ward before and after Hurricane Katrina. 



The six room exhibit is open Tuesday to Sunday, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission to the museum is free.

George and Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art

Another way to celebrate the commemorative month is to experience it through art. The George and Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art collects local, national and international art and exhibits created by various individuals in the African Diaspora.

The museum is open by appointment only. Admission is $10 per person. Students and senior admission is $7.

Le Musée de f.p.c.

The Le Musee de f.p.c (free people of color) is a historic home museum that showcases the culture and history of free people of color in New Orleans from pre-civil war to post civil-rights. Admission to the museum is $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Tours are available Wednesday through Sunday at 1 p.m. by appointment only. Larger groups can request tours outside of designated appointment times.

A photo posted by Crystal D Paull (@cpaullatx) on

New Orleans Public Library Main Branch (February 13, 6 p.m.)

On Monday, February 13, 6 p.m.Library Branch will screen The 13th, a documentary directed by Ava DuVernay, which is a close look at the prison system in the United States and how it is intertwined with racial inequality.

A photo posted by @doctoredphotographs on

Norman Mayer Library (February 18, 1p.m.)

On Saturday, February 18, at 1 p.m., the Norman Mayer Library is hosting a Black History month story time for children between the ages of 5-12. The library is urging participants to RSVP for the event.

Robert E. Smith Regional Library (February 7, 6 p.m.)

On Tuesday, February 7, at 6 p.m., the Norman Mayer Library Branch will screen The 13th, a documentary directed by Ava DuVernay, which is a close look at the prison system in the United States and how it is intertwined with racial inequality.

Latter Library Branch (February 11, 1 p.m.)

This weekend, on Saturday, February 11, at 1 p.m., the Latter Library branch library will host a Gullah Folklore event, which paints a story of descendants of West African slaves in the Southern United States

A photo posted by Berry (@berrylikestraw) on

Dillard University (February 15, 6 p.m.)

Dillard University will screen the 2015 Documentary “Rosenwald,” which is the story of a businessman in the early 1900’s who spent his wealth in the American South, building over 5,000 schools. The event will be held in Dillard’s Georges auditorium on Wednesday Feb. 15, at 6 p.m. The event is free an open to the public.

Xavier University (February 16, 6 p.m.)

On Wednesday, Feb. 16, in Xavier's university Center, New York Daily News senior justice writer Shaun King will speak on his experience in the Black Lives Matter movement. The event is free and open to the public.

A photo posted by Shaun King (@shaunking) on

Studio BE

Located in the Bywater is a 35,000 square foot warehouse that has been temporarily converted into a solo visual art exhibit. Studio BE is the brainchild of Brandan “BMike” Odums, a native of New Orleans and a community advocate. The exhibit Studio Be, a series of spray painted art that reflects Odums consciousness and concerns of social issues plaguing the United States, is the final installment of Odum’s “BE” series. The Studio, opened Wednesday through Saturday, from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., is planned to close permanently in May 2017.

A photo posted by Studio BE (@studio_be_) on

Amistad Research Center

The Amistad Research Center has the nation largest reserve of manuscripts regarding Africans America, race relations and civil rights. The center has over 15 million documents. The Amistad is free and open to the public, Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

A photo posted by Amanda✨ (@amanda_learning) on

East New Orleans Library (February 18, 11 a.m)

This weekend, on Saturday, February 18, at 11 a.m., the East New Orleans Library will host a Gullah Folklore event, which paints a story of descendants of West African slaves in the Southern United States